May
19
Filed Under (Boat Reviews) by Debbie on 19-05-2008

The Catalina 30 sailboat is a typical, fairly light displacement design with a fin keel and a displacement of 10,200 lbs which exceeds the displacement of my boat that comes in at 8,500 lbs. The Catalina 30 sailboat came with an external lead keel bolted to the hull with stainless steel bolts.

The Atomic 4 gas engine was the standard although starting in 1978 Universal diesels became available. The engine is located midships and substantial vibration can be felt in the cabin. Unless modifications were made by previous owners, there is no soundproofing so she’ll be really noisy underway while in the cabin.

The Catalina 30 with a fin keel and spade rudder is quite maneuverable under power. The deck is wide enough to move around on and the shrouds are placed inboard enough to make going around them easy. There are also teak grabrails on the cabin top which can be very helpful underway.

The cockpit is large and comfortable which makes me question its practicality offshore when combined with the small cockpit drains. There is a permanently mounted manual bilge pump that can be operated from the cockpit. Our boat has this and it’s a great feature!  In 1986 the cockpit was redesigned to accomodate wheel steering that was becoming more popular.

Inside there is the typical v-berth that along with the filler makes into a good double sized bed. The head is comfortable and the optional shower drains into the bilge. The salon is a good size particularly when the folding table is up against the forward bulkhead and there are berths both port and starboard. The galley is to port and offers more than ‘hip wide’ working space. The engine is located under the settee and part of the galley counter. It’s pretty tight but there’s good access through traps in the settee. While there is a double berth to aft part of it is a pretty tight fit and you’ll need to be comfortable with limited space.

Doesn’t matter what boat there are some issues common to each make and there have been reports of leaking cabin windows, rot in the encapsulated wood under the compression post that support the deck-stepped mast and early Catalina 30 sailboat suffered from weak chainplate attachments, which were addressed by the builder.  To find out how to repair the leaky windows you’ll want to visit this site. If you own a Catalina 30 please feel free to add your comments below…the good… the bad…the ugly. Remember to click on Archives to find more articles. Thanks for visiting and enjoy your Catalina 30 sailboat!



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